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Showing posts from December, 2017

Books of Note

Shantaram by Gregory David Roberts

Yah, yah, I know, I’ve been lollygaggin’ and work-shyin’ and leaving all my lovely spammers in Tamil Nadu with nothing on which to post spam but old reviews. I’ve not even been all that busy, except when it comes to slapping on weight and destroying some neural connections, both of which I’ve done with glazed-eyed indifference and robotic monotony. Still, I feel I owe it to GDR to at least put Shantaram to bed before I buy (whoops, sorry, already done) and read his next book, The Mountain Shadow, which even now is winging its way to my door by the magic of Amazon Prime Same Day DeliveryTM.
It turns out that GDR was indeed a bit of a knob. He robbed building societies in Australia, always dressed in a three-piece suit and minding his Ps & Qs, and only targeting those with adequate insurance. How he knew which did and didn’t have adequate insurance is not mentioned. On the back of this, or maybe it was the other way around, his wife kicked him out and he lost contact with his only da…

The Vorrh by Brian Catling

There are some books on which I find myself taking a weary chance purely by the weight of Amazonian algorithmic pressure. This is by no means a good reason to buy a book (although what better reason is there to buy one other than there is a book there to buy?) but at 99p an electronic book is easily discarded if it fails to grip. And ths one kept coming up on Amazon, over and over. And over. I grew to hate its cover, the name, the single initial forename of the author. I was in fact dead set against enjoying or even being fair-handed in criticism of the book when finally I turned the first virtual page. 

Prejudice isn't strong enough to describe the feeling.

HOWEVER (in capitals so it's shouty and unavoidable) disregard everything I've said above. 99p is an absolute bargain for this (although I intend to purchase a hard copy when funds allow). It is ineffable, but I will attempt something of a review to give you an idea of why you should drop everything and buy a copy of thi…

The Lost Time Accidents by John Wray

Yah, so, of course I’ve left too long between reading and reviewing once again, leaving myself little scope to write anything profound or shocking, or even remotely truthful, without recourse to the book itself, now gathering dust and a creeping blue mould on the shelf above the permanently cold storage heater in my bedroom (a good six or so miles from where I sit taking the opportunity to distract myself from a post-prandial slump and slack supervision).
But when has that ever stopped me?
Big and brash, ranging from art to science with major meandering asides into ontology, epistemology, and the character of space and time, Wray’s disjointed family chronicle is fun to read for the most part, if ultimately dissatisfying. Waldemar Toula has become estranged from the linear narrative of time somehow, trapped in a version of his dead aunts’ labyrinthine New York apartment-cum-mausoleum of lost things and visited occasionally by his uncle (or great-uncle? I can’t remember) and namesake, Wal…

Acceptance: The Southern Reach Trilogy Book 3 by Jeff VanderMeer